Archive for the Christianity Category

Warning to those who threaten me

Posted in Christianity, cults, Hate, Israel, Israeli, Jewish History, Online racism, racism, Religion, The Torah on May 28, 2009 by Michael Burks

All comments that contain threats will be given to the FBI. I could care less who likes me or who hates me. My blog was not created to make friends. I deal with Jewish History, such as lies against them and ect. I know many of the lies about the Jewish people  because I was guilty of much of it myself. My goal is to educate people about the Jewish people from the “Gentile” point of view.

As a Christian, I owe much of what I believe and follow to the Jewish people. If that upsets people, then so be it. I have already turned in threats in the past. And for those who don’t  know, action has been taken against certain people. And trust me, I don’t mind turning in more people. If people go to jail, so be it. I could care less. You want to make threats, deal with the FBI. I won’t tolerate them.

Pope Benedict supports Muslims – just like the Pope supported Nazi Germany during WW II

Posted in Arabs, Bible, Catholic Church, Christianity, cults, Hate, Islam, Israel, Israeli, Jewish History, Middle East, New Testament, News, Old Testament, Pope, Religion, The Torah, Uncategorized with tags , , , on May 13, 2009 by Michael Burks

What a shock that the current Catholic Pope supports Muslims and not Israel. For those who don’t recall, the Catholic “Church” and Pope also supported Hitler and Nazi Germany while millions of Jews were driven from their homes to suffer and die.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/middleeast/palestinianauthority/5320110/Pope-Benedict-XVI-supports-Palestinian-state-and-criticises-Israeli-barrier.html

Pope Benedict XVI criticised the concrete security wall

Pope Benedict XVI criticised the concrete security wall “towering over us”, saying it was “tragic” to see barriers erected between the two communities. Photo: REUTERS

Speaking in Bethlehem, where he delivered his most sensitive speech yet of an eight-day tour of the Holy Land, Benedict XVI acknowledged the suffering of the Palestinian people following the establishment of Israel in 1948.

But he also urged moderation, telling Palestinians they should not use violence to further their cause.

Speaking later at the Aida refugee camp, he criticised the concrete security wall “towering over us”, saying it was “tragic” to see barriers erected between the two communities.

The Pope, who also celebrated mass in Manger Square in front of the ancient Church of the Nativity, believed to mark the birthplace of Jesus, sent a message of solidarity with moderate Palestinians such as Mahmoud Abbas, the Fatah leader and president of the Palestinian national authority, when he gave his support to proposals for a “two-state solution”.

“The Holy See supports the right of your people to a sovereign Palestinian homeland in the land of your forefathers, secure and at peace with its neighbours, within internationally recognised borders,” the Pope said.

“I know how much you have suffered and continue to suffer as a result of the turmoil that has afflicted this land for decades,” the Pope said.

“It is my earnest hope that the serious concerns involving security in Israel and the Palestinian territories will soon be allayed sufficiently to allow greater freedom of movement, especially with regard to contact between family members and access to the holy places.”

In remarks aimed at the many militant groups within the Palestinian community, the Pope said they should “resist temptations to resort to acts of violence”.

Israel was nominally behind the two-state plan until the recent election of a Right-wing government led by Benjamin Netanyahu which has said it is reviewing its position on the issue. The Pope is due to meet the Israeli prime minister on Thursday.

After two days in Israel the Pope had to cross into the occupied West Bank where Bethlehem is located.

This meant he had to pass through the 10-yard-high concrete wall built by Israel around Bethlehem.

Deemed illegal under international law, Israel has nevertheless pressed on with its construction on the grounds that it deters suicide bombings and other security threats.

In the afternoon he spoke at the Aida refugee camp, one of several housing Palestinian families driven from their homes through the creation of Israel in the second half of the 20th century.

Israel had forced the organisers of the event at Aida to move the stage so it would not be dominated by the security wall but this did not stop the pontiff criticising the barrier.

“Towering over us … is a stark reminder of the stalemate that relations between Israelis and Palestinians seem to have reached – the wall,” the Pope said.

“In a world where more and more borders are being opened up – to trade, to travel, to movement of peoples, to cultural exchanges – it is tragic to see walls still being erected.”

Speaking after his visit, he issued a message of hope. “I have seen, adjoining the camp and overshadowing much of Bethlehem, the wall that intrudes into your territories, separating neighbours and dividing families,” he said.

“Although walls can easily be built, we all know that they do not last for ever. They can be taken down.”

KKK pretends they like people – lol

Posted in Christianity, cults, Hate, Israel, Israeli, News, Online racism, racism, Religion, World News on May 12, 2009 by Michael Burks

http://dallasmorningviewsblog.dallasnews.com/archives/2009/05/the-new-improve.html

There appears to be a growing number of racist incidents against blacks that civil rights groups in Dallas are attributing to white supremacist groups. We’ve heard reports of a white supremacist group setting up an office or residence in South Dallas, of all places. Yesterday, a group gathered at the Old Red Courthouse to draw attention to the distribution of Ku Klux Klan recruitment fliers being distributed in Forney and racial and sexual graffiti being placed on a church bus in Bedford.

Well, Forrest Lee, imperial klazik and spokesman for the regional Klan, wants to make it clear that his group is no longer the bunch of supremacist thugs who engaged in midnight lynchings, cross-burnings, kidnappings and other terrorist activities across the South.

“We would never do anything like that,” he said of the incident in Bedford. “We’re not the Klan of the ’60s and ’70s. We do not practice hate.”
I’m amazed this group still exists legally, with its own spokesman and phone number and everything. It’s as if this nation has a double standard on terrorism. If the terrorist group conducted its activities against an oppressed racial minority, then it’s all right. But if it conducts its activities against establishment people in business suits in big buildings, that’s bad.

I wonder if, in a few years, people will be able to claim membership in al-Qaeda and proclaim, “Hey, we’re not the al-Qaeda of the 1990s and 2000s. We don’t practice beheadings and kidnappings and mass murders anymore. We do not practice hate.”

Right.

Swine – God was right, very unclean to eat

Posted in Bible, Christianity, cults, Israel, Israeli, Jewish History, News, Old Testament, Religion, The Torah, Uncategorized, World News with tags , , , on April 30, 2009 by Michael Burks

With Swine flu spreading and taking it’s first American life; God was right, Swine is unclean. I myself trust the God of Israel and I always take his advice. He said swine was unclean and well, I agree with Him 100%.

This doesn’t shock me. Millions of us Gentiles disobey God daily and eat unclean animals. Churches even lead the way by misquoting what Paul actually taught and by lying about what Christ taught. We as people deserve this. When you mock God, see what happens?

     

  • When wild inhabited the woods.
    Psalms 80:13 The boar out of the wood doth waste it, and the wild beast of the field doth devour it.

     

  • Unclean and not to be eaten.
    Leviticus 11:7-8 And the swine, though he divide the hoof, and be clovenfooted, yet he cheweth not the cud; he is unclean to you. Of their flesh shall ye not eat, and their carcase shall ye not touch; they are unclean to you.

     

  • DESCRIBED AS
       

    • Fierce and ungenerous.
      Matthew 7:6 Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet, and turn again and rend you.

       

    • Filthy in its habits.
      2 Peter 2:22 But it is happened unto them according to the true proverb, The dog is turned to his own vomit again; and the sow that was washed to her wallowing in the mire.

       

    • Destructive to agriculture.
      Psalms 80:13 The boar out of the wood doth waste it, and the wild beast of the field doth devour it.

     

  • Fed upon husks.
    Luke 15:16 And he would fain have filled his belly with the husks that the swine did eat: and no man gave unto him.

     

  • Sacrificing of, and abomination.
    Isaiah 66:3 He that killeth an ox is as if he slew a man; he that sacrificeth a lamb, as if he cut off a dog’s neck; he that offereth an oblation, as if he offered swine’s blood; he that burneth incense, as if he blessed an idol. Yea, they have chosen their own ways, and their soul delighteth in their abominations.

     

  • Kept in large herds.
    Matthew 8:30 And there was a good way off from them an herd of many swine feeding.

     

  • Herding of, considered as the greatest degradation to a Jew.
    Luke 15:15 And he went and joined himself to a citizen of that country; and he sent him into his fields to feed swine.

     

  • The Gergesenes punished for having.
    Matthew 8:31-32 So the devils besought him, saying, If thou cast us out, suffer us to go away into the herd of swine. And he said unto them, Go. And when they were come out, they went into the herd of swine: and, behold, the whole herd of swine ran violently down a steep place into the sea, and perished in the waters.

     

  • The ungodly Jews condemned for eating.
    Isaiah 65:4 Which remain among the graves, and lodge in the monuments, which eat swine’s flesh, and broth of abominable things is in their vessels;
    Isaiah 66:17 They that sanctify themselves, and purify themselves in the gardens behind one tree in the midst, eating swine’s flesh, and the abomination, and the mouse, shall be consumed together, saith the LORD.

     

  • ILLUSTRATIVE OF
       

    • The wicked.
      Matthew 7:6 Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet, and turn again and rend you.

       

    • Hypocrites.
      2 Peter 2:22 But it is happened unto them according to the true proverb, The dog is turned to his own vomit again; and the sow that was washed to her wallowing in the mire.

Nazis use Tea Party protests to enter the “Mainstream”

Posted in Bible, Christianity, cults, Hate, Israel, Israeli, Jewish History, Middle East, News, racism, Religion, Uncategorized, World News with tags , , , on April 16, 2009 by Michael Burks

Don’t believe me? Read some of their links –

http://www.stormfront.org/forum/showthread.php?t=591434

http://www.stormfront.org/forum/showthread.php?t=591601

http://www.stormfront.org/forum/showthread.php?t=591509

Obama reaches out to Iran – disgrace

Posted in Arabs, Bible, Christianity, Hate, Islam, Israel, Israeli, Jewish History, Middle East, News, Uncategorized, World News with tags , , , , , on April 15, 2009 by Michael Burks

http://www.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/meast/03/20/obama.iran.video/

The message is a dramatic shift in tone from that of the Bush administration, which included Iran, along with North Korea and Iraq, in an “axis of evil.” It also echoes Obama’s inaugural speech, in which he said to the Muslim world, “we seek a new way forward, based on mutual interest and mutual respect.”

In Friday’s video, Obama said: “The United States wants the Islamic Republic of Iran to take its rightful place in the community of nations. You have that right, but it comes with real responsibilities. And that place cannot be reached through terror or arms, but rather through peaceful actions that demonstrate the true greatness of the Iranian people and civilization.”

There was no immediate response from Tehran to Obama’s message, but Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said last month that his country would welcome talks with the United States “in a fair atmosphere with mutual respect.”

The United States, several European nations and Israel suspect that Tehran has been trying to acquire the capacity to build nuclear weapons, but Iran says its nuclear program is solely for peaceful purposes.

Last month, the Washington-based Institute for Science and International Security released a report saying that Iran has reached “nuclear weapons breakout capability” — it has enough uranium to make a nuclear bomb.

Happy Easter? Never, Easter is a Pagan ritual, enough said!

Posted in Bible, Christianity, Jewish History, New Testament, News, Old Testament, Religion, The Torah, Uncategorized with tags , , , on April 12, 2009 by Michael Burks

Sad millions of Christians are out giving thanks to a Pagan ritual today. Easter was, and always will be a Pagan day of worship.

Israel proves Jews are God’s chosen

Posted in Bible, Christianity, cults, Israel, Israeli, Jewish History, Middle East, New Testament, Old Testament, Religion, The Torah on April 9, 2009 by Michael Burks

http://therefinersfire.org/israel_born_in_one_day.htm

Isaiah 66:7-8: Before going into labor, she gave birth; before her pains came, she delivered a male child. Who ever heard of such at thing? Who has ever seen such things? Is a country born in one day? Is a nation brought forth all at once? For as soon as Tziyon went into labor, she brought forth her children. – Stern’s Complete Jewish Bible


Isaiah 66:7-8

Israel would reborn in just one day….
Bible passage: Isaiah 66:7-8
Prophet: Isaiah
Written: perhaps between 701-681 BC
Fulfilled: 1948

In Isaiah 66:7-8, the prophet foreshadowed the re-birth of Israel, which happened in 1948. Isaiah describes a woman giving birth before going into labor, and he speaks of a country being born in one day. This accurately describes what happened on May 14, 1948 – when the Jews declared independence for Israel as a united and sovereign nation for the first time in 2900 years.

During that same day, the United States issued a statement recognizing Israel’s sovereignty. And, only hours beforehand, a United Nations mandate expired, ending British control of the land. During a 24-hour span of time, foreign control of the land of Israel had formally ceased, and Israel had declared its independence, and its independence was acknowledged by other nations. Modern Israel was literally was born in a single day.

Isaiah said the birth would take place before there would be labor pains. And that too is precisely what happened. A movement called Zionism began in the 1800s to encourage Jews worldwide to move to Israel, which at that time was called Palestine. Within hours of the declaration of independence in 1948, Israel was attacked by the surrounding countries of Egypt, Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq and Saudi Arabia.

When reading Isaiah 66:7-8, keep in mind that Israel’s status as a sovereign nation was established and reaffirmed during the course of a single day, and that it was born of a movement called Zionism, and that its declaration of independence was not the result of a war but rather the cause of one.

 

Note – Christian Identity nut-cases never quote the above verse. America, which they claim is the new “Jerusalem” was not born in one day like the nation of Israel was.

April 14 – Jewish Passover

Posted in Christianity, Israel, Israeli, Jewish History, Middle East, Religion, World News with tags , , , , on April 7, 2009 by Michael Burks

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passover

 

Passover
Passover
Machine-made matzo, one of the options of unleavened bread eaten on Passover.
Official name Hebrew: פסח (Pesach)
Observed by Jews, Samaritans, Hebrew Roots
Type One of the Three Pilgrim Festivals
Significance Celebrates the Exodus, the freedom from slavery of the Children of Israel from ancient Egypt that followed the Ten Plagues.
Beginning of the 49 days of Counting of the Omer
Begins 14th day of Nisan
Ends 21st day of Nisan in Israel, and among some liberal Diaspora Jews; 22nd day of Nisan outside of Israel among more traditional Diaspora Jews.
2009 date sunset of April 8 to nightfall of 15 April / 16 April
2010 date sunset of March 29 to nightfall of 5 April / 6 April
Celebrations In Jewish practice, one or two festive Seder meals – first two nights; in the times of the Temple in Jerusalem, the Korban Pesach. In Samaritan practice, men gather for a religious ceremony on Mount Gerizim that includes the ancient Passover Sacrifice.
Related to Shavuot (“Festival [of] Weeks”) which follows 49 days from the second night of Passover.

Passover (Hebrew, Yiddish: פֶּסַח, He-Pesach.ogg Pesach (help·info), Tiberian: pɛsaħ, Israeli: Pesah, Pesakh, Yiddish: Peysekh, Paysokh) is a Jewish and Samaritan holy day and festival commemorating God sparing the Israelites when he killed the first born of Egypt, and is the seven day Feast of the Unleavened Bread (it lasts eight days in the diaspora) commemorating the Exodus from Egypt and the liberation of the Israelites from slavery.[1]

Passover begins on the 14th day of the first month of the Hebrew calendar (equivalent to March and April in Gregorian calendar) according to the Hebrew Bible.[2]

In the story of the Exodus, the Bible tells that God inflicted ten plagues upon the Egyptians before Pharaoh would release his Israelite slaves, with the tenth plague being the killing of firstborn sons. The Israelites were instructed to mark the doorposts of their homes with the blood of a spring lamb and, upon seeing this, the spirit of the Lord passed over these homes, hence the term “passover”.[3] When Pharaoh freed the Israelites, it is said that they left in such a hurry that they could not wait for bread to rise. In commemoration, for the duration of Passover, no leavened bread is eaten, for which reason it is also called חַג הַמַּצּוֹת (Ḥag haMaẓot), “The Festival of the Unleavened Bread”.[4] Matza (unleavened bread) is the primary symbol of the holiday. This bread that is flat and unrisen is called Matzo.

Together with Shavuot (“Pentecost”) and Sukkot (“Tabernacles”), Passover is one of the three pilgrim festivals (Shalosh Regalim) during which the entire Jewish populace historically made a pilgrimage to the Temple in Jerusalem. Samaritans still make this pilgrimage to Mount Gerizim, but only men participate in public worship.[5][6]

Contents

[hide]

[edit] Date in the spring and length

Passover begins on the 14th day of the first month, which corresponds to the full moon of Nisan, the first month of the Hebrew calendar, in accordance with the Hebrew Bible.[2] Passover is a spring festival, so the 14th of Nisan begins on the night of a full moon after the vernal equinox. To ensure that Passover did not start before spring, the tradition in ancient Israel held that the 1st of Nisan would not start until the barley is ripe, being the test for the onset of spring.[7] If the barley was not ripe an intercalary month (Adar II) would be added. However, since at least the 12th century, the date has been determined mathematically.

In Israel, Passover is the seven-day holiday of the Feast of Unleavened Bread, with the first and last days observed as legal holidays and as holy days involving abstention from work, special prayer services, and holiday meals; the intervening days are known as Chol HaMoed (“festival days”). Diaspora Jews historically observed the festival for eight days, and most still do. Reform and Reconstructionst Jews and Israeli Jews, wherever they are, usually observe the holiday over seven days. The reason for this extra day is due to enactment of the Sages. It is thought by many scholars that Jews outside of Israel could not be certain if their local calendars fully conformed to practice of the temple at Jerusalem, so they added an extra day. But as this practice only attaches to certain (major) holy days, others posit the extra day may have been added to accommodate people who had to travel long distances to participate in communal worship and ritual practices; or the practice may have evolved as a compromise between conflicting interpretations of Jewish Law regarding the calendar; or it may have evolved as a safety measure in areas where Jews were commonly in danger, so that their enemies could not be certain on which day to attack.[8]
Karaite Jews and Samaritans use different versions of the Jewish calendar, which are often out of sync with the modern Jewish calendar by one or two days. In 2009, for example, Nisan 15 on the Jewish calendar used by Rabbinical Judaism corresponds to April 9. On the older Jewish calendars used by Karaites and Samaritans, Abib or Aviv 15 (as opposed to ‘Nisan’) corresponds to April 11 in 2009. The Karaite and Samaritan Passovers are each one day long, followed by the six day Festival of Unleavened Bread – for a total of seven days.

[edit] Origins of the festival

Passover is a biblically-mandated holiday, indicating that it was already old and traditional by the time of the redaction of the Pentateuch:

In the first month, on the fourteenth day of the month between the two evenings is the LORD’S Passover. And on the fifteenth day of the same month is the feast of unleavened bread unto the LORD; seven days ye shall eat unleavened bread. In the first day ye shall have a holy convocation; ye shall do no manner of servile work. And ye shall bring an offering made by fire unto the LORD seven days; in the seventh day is a holy convocation; ye shall do no manner of servile work. (Leviticus 23:5)

The biblical regulations for the observance of the festival, which reflect early postexilic practice, require that all leavening be disposed of before the beginning of the 14th of Nisan.[9] An unblemished lamb or kid is to be set apart on Nisan 10,[10] and slaughtered on Nisan 14 “between the two evenings”,[11] a phrase which is, however, not defined. It is then to be eaten “that night”, Nisan 14,[12] roasted, without the removal of its internal organs [13]with unleavened bread and bitter herbs.[14] Nothing of the sacrifice on which the sun rises may be eaten, but must be burned.[15] The sacrifices may only be performed in Jerusalem.[16]

Some of these details can be corroborated, and to some extent amplified, in later postexilic sources. The removal (or “sealing up”) of the leaven is referred to the Passover Papyrus, an Aramaic papyrus from 5th century BCE Elephantine in Egypt. [17] The slaughter of the lambs on the 14th is mentioned in The Book of Jubilees, a Jewish work of the Ptolemaic period, and by the Herodian-era writers Josephus and Philo. These sources also indicate that “between the two evenings” was taken to mean the afternoon.[18] Jubilees states the sacrifice was eaten that night,[19] and together with Josephus states that nothing of the sacrifice was allowed to remain until morning.[20] Philo states that the banquet included hymns and prayers.[21]

The Biblical commandments concerning the Passover (and the Feast of Unleavened Bread) stress the importance of remembering:

And thou shalt remember that thou wast a bondman in Egypt; and thou shalt observe and do these statutes.” (Deuteronomy 16:12)

Exodus 12:14 commands, in reference to God’s sparing of the firstborn from the Tenth Plague:

And this day shall be unto you for a memorial, and ye shall keep it a feast to the LORD; throughout your generations ye shall keep it a feast by an ordinance for ever.

Exodus 13:3 repeats the command to remember:

Remember this day, in which you came out of Egypt, out of the house of bondage, for by strength the hand of the LORD brought you out from this place.

[edit] Origin of the name

“The Jews’ Passover”—facsimile of a miniature from a 15th century missal, ornamented with paintings of the School of Van Eyck

The verb “pasàch” (Hebrew: פָּסַח‎) is first mentioned in the Torah account of the Exodus from Egypt (Exodus 12:23), and there is some debate about its exact meaning: the commonly-held assumption that it means “He passed over”, in reference to God “passing over” the houses of the Israelites during the final of the Ten Plagues of Egypt, stems from the translation provided in the Septuagint (παρελευσεται in Exodus 12:23, and εσκεπασεν in Exodus 12:27). Judging from other instances of the verb, and instances of parallelism, a more faithful translation may be “he hovered over, guarding.” Indeed, this is the image used by Isaiah by his use of this verb in Isaiah. 31:5: “As birds hovering, so will the Lord of hosts protect Jerusalem; He will deliver it as He protecteth it, He will rescue it as He passeth over” (כְּצִפֳּרִים עָפוֹת—כֵּן יָגֵן יְהוָה צְבָאוֹת, עַל-יְרוּשָׁלִָם; גָּנוֹן וְהִצִּיל, פָּסֹחַ וְהִמְלִיט.) (Isaiah 31:5) Targum Unkoles translates pesach as “he had pity”, The English term “Passover” came into the English language through William Tyndale‘s translation of the Bible, and later appeared in the King James Version as well.

The term Pesach (Hebrew: פֶּסַח‎) may also refer to the lamb or kid which was designated as the Passover sacrifice (called the Korban Pesach in Hebrew). Four days before the Exodus, the Israelites were commanded to set aside a lamb or kid (Exodus 12:3) and inspect it daily for blemishes. During the day on the 14th of Nisan, they were to slaughter the animal and use its blood to mark their lintels and door posts. Up until midnight on the 15th of Nisan, they were to consume the lamb. Each family (or group of families) gathered together to eat a meal that included the meat of the Korban Pesach while the Tenth Plague ravaged Egypt.

In subsequent years, during the existence of the Tabernacle and later the Temple in Jerusalem, the Korban Pesach was eaten during the Passover Seder on the 15th of Nisan. However, following the destruction of the Temple, no sacrifices may be offered or eaten. The Seder Korban Pesach, a set of scriptural and Rabbinic passages dealing with the Passover sacrifice, is customarily recited during or after the Mincha (afternoon prayer) service on the 14th on Nisan.[22] The story of the Korban Pesach is also retold at the Passover Seder,meaning order, and the symbolic food which represents it on the Seder Plate is usually a roasted lamb shankbone, chicken wing, or chicken neck.

[edit] Historic offering, “Korban Pesach

When the Temple in Jerusalem was standing, the focus of the Passover festival was the Korban Pesach (lit. “Pesach sacrifice,” also known as the “Paschal Lamb”). Every family large enough to completely consume a young lamb or Wild Goat was required to offer one for sacrifice at the Jewish Temple on the afternoon of the 14th day of Nisan,[23] and eat it that night, which was the 15th of Nisan.[24] If the family was too small to finish eating the entire offering in one sitting, an offering was made for a group of families. The offering could not be slaughtered while one was in possession of leaven,[25] and had to be roasted, without its head, feet, or inner organs being removed[26] and eaten together with matzo (unleavened bread) and maror (bitter herbs).[27] One had to be careful not to break any bones from the offering,[28] and none of the meat could be left over by morning.[29]

Because of the Korban Pesach’s status as a sacred offering, the only people allowed to eat it were those who have the obligation to bring the offering. Among those who can not offer or eat the Korban Pesach are: An apostate (Exodus 12:43), a servant (Exodus 12:45), an uncircumcised man (Exodus 12:48), a person in a state of ritual impurity, except when a majority of Jews are in such a state (Pesahim 66b), and a non-Jew. The offering must be made before a quorum of 30 (Pesahim 64b). In the Temple, the Levites sing Hallel while the Kohanim perform the sacrificial service. Men and women are equally obligated regarding the Korban Pesach (Pesahim 91b).

Women were obligated, as men, to perform the Korban Pesach and to participate in a Seder.

Today, in the absence of the Temple, the mitzvah of the Korban Pesach is memorialized in the Seder Korban Pesach, recited in the afternoon of Nisan 14, and in the form of symbolic food placed on the Passover Seder Plate, which is usually a roasted shankbone. Many Sephardic Jews, however, have the opposite custom of eating lamb or goat meat during the Seder in memory of the Korban Pesach

[edit] Modern observance and preparation

Many Jews observe the positive Torah commandment of eating matzo on the first night of Passover at the Passover Seder, as well as the Torah prohibition against eating chametz – certain leavening and fermenting agents, and things made with them, such as yeast breads, certain types of cake and biscuit, and certain alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages—but wine is an essential component of Passover, notwithstanding it being a fermented, yeast-bearing beverage. Karaite Jews are not bound by the oral law, under which “chametz” includes not only leavening agents but the grains from which bread is commonly made. Specifically, five grains, and products made from them, may not be used during Passover—wheat, rye, barley, oats, and spelt—except for making matzo, which must be made from one of these five grains. This is because the oral law decrees they begin to ferment within eighteen minutes of contact with water. So, despite pasta not being a leavened product, macaroni products cannot be owned or used during Passover under this interpretation of Jewish Law. Ashkenazic rabbinical tradition also forbids the use of rice, most legumes and new world grains like maize (unknown to the old world when the Bible was written), because they might be made into bread (such as cornbread). Sephardic and other rabbinical traditions do not have this prohibition.

[edit] Chametz

Chametz (חמץ, “leavening”) refers either to a grain product that is already fermented (e.g. yeast breads, certain types of cake, and most alcoholic beverages) or a substance that can cause fermentation (e.g. yeast or sourdough). The specific definition varies between religious and ethno-cultural traditions. The consumption of chametz and, under the oral law, its possession, are forbidden during Passover in most Jewish traditions.

In Ashkenazic and certain Sephardic applications of Jewish Law, “chametz” does not include baking soda, baking powder or like products. Although these are leavening agents, they leaven by chemical reaction whereas the prohibition against chametz is understood to apply only to fermentation. Thus, bagels, waffles and pancakes made with baking soda and matzo meal are considered permissible, while bagels made with yeast, sourdough pancakes and waffles, and the like, are prohibited. Karaite Jews and many non-Ashkenazic Jewish traditions do not observe a distinction between chemical leavening and leavening by fermentation.

The Torah commandments regarding chametz are:

  • To remove all chametz from one’s home, including things made with chametz, before the first day of Passover. (Exodus 12:15). It may be simply used up, thrown out (historically, destroyed by burning, since there was no weekly garbage pickup in ancient times), or given or sold to non-Jews (or non-Samaritans, as the case may be).

[edit] Spring Mega-Cleaning

Observant Jews typically spend the weeks before Passover in a flurry of thorough housecleaning, to remove every morsel of chametz from every part of the home. The oral Jewish law (Halakha) requires the elimination of olive-sized or larger quantities of leavening from one’s possession, but most housekeeping goes beyond this. Even the cracks of kitchen counters are thoroughly scrubbed, for example, to remove any traces of flour and yeast, however small.

Traditionally, Jews do a formal search for remaining chametz (“bedikat chametz“) after nightfall on the evening before Passover (which is also the evening that precedes the Fast of the Firstborn). A blessing is read (על ביעור חמץ – al biyur chametz, “on the removal of chametz”) and one or more members of the household proceed from room to room to ensure no crumbs remain in any corner. In very traditional families, the search may be conducted by the head of the household; in more modern families, the children may be the ones who do the search, under the careful supervision of their parents.

It is customary to turn off the lights and conduct the search by candlelight, using a feather and a wooden spoon: candlelight effectively illuminates corners without casting shadows; the feather can dust crumbs out of their hiding places; and the wooden spoon which collects the crumbs can be burned the next day with the chametz.

Because the house is assumed to have been thoroughly cleaned by the night before Passover, there is some concern that making a blessing over the search for chametz will be for nought (“bracha l’vatala“) if nothing is found. Thus, ten pieces of bread smaller than the size of an olive are hidden throughout the house in order to ensure that there is chametz to be found.

Official: Hamas won’t form government recognizes Israel

Posted in Arabs, Christianity, Hate, Islam, Israel, Israeli, Jewish History, Middle East, News, racism, Religion, Uncategorized with tags , , , on April 7, 2009 by Michael Burks

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2009-04/07/content_11144500.htm

GAZA, April 7 (Xinhua) — A senior Islamic Hamas movement official reiterated on Tuesday that his movement wouldn’t accept forming a new unity government that recognizes the Jewish state.

    Ismail Radwan said in a statement sent to reporters “We won’t deal with any proposal or project, presented to the movement, that calls for abiding by the international Quartet requirements or recognizing Israel.”

    The commitments to the Quartet’s requirements is the core of substantial differences between the Islamic movement that rules the Gaza Strip and west-supported President Mahmoud Abbas.

    So far, a marathon and intensive dialogue held in Cairo between the two sides in March, which will be resumed on April 26, had failed to overcome major differences, mainly to agree on the platform of any new unity government.

    “Forming any Palestinian government that commits itself to the Quartet’s requirements and recognizing Israel as a legitimate state on the land of Palestine is not on Hamas Agenda,” said Radwan.

    Radwan expressed hope that the coming third round of dialogue expected on April 26 “would be more flexible and positive in order to overcome our differences and achieve our national unity.”

    Meanwhile, chief Palestinian negotiator to the dialogue with Hamas Ahmed Qurei said in a statement that the coming round of inter-reconciliation dialogue “will be final and decisive.”

    He accused Hamas movement for being hard in its position and not changing it in spite of several rounds of dialogue, adding that “Fatah is keen to make this dialogue success and is not intending to give up.”

    “We are still having the same differences on four major issues: reforming the PLO, the security forces, the political platform and the upcoming elections. So far we haven’t moved on inch in any of the four issues,” said Qurei.